Scholarly Articles

  • [Image: THESE are the Best Bulletproof Ab Exercises: Squats, Deads, Chins & Olympic Lifts]

    THESE are the Best Bulletproof Ab Exercises: Squats, Deads, Chins & Olympic Lifts

     Article by - The Poliquin Group 

    Get the best-looking abs by training exercises that integrate all the key muscle groups of the trunk or “core.” Don’t waste time on endless isolation abdominal exercises or 15-minute ab programs.

    A series of research studies reveals two key points about abdominal training:

    1) Core strength is necessary to prevent injury in athletes, improve mobility in the general public, and optimize functional performance in everyone.

    2) The best way to build a stronger back and tighter abs is with compound movements such as squats, deadlifts, chin-ups, lunges, and Olympic lifts.

    A new study in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research highlights both points. This study compared muscle activation as measured with electromyography (EMG) in the trunk muscles in isolation and compound abdominal exercises.

    Isolation exercises were those that only trained the proximal trunk muscles of the lumbar and abdominal region (rectus abdominus, obliques, and erector spinae), such as a crunch and lateral crunch. The integration exercises engaged the proximal trunk muscles as well as the anterior deltoid, gluteus, and thoracic erector spinae with exercises such as a plank with hand reach, mountain climber, and bird dog exercise with added resistance.

    Results showed that the integration exercises activated the abdominal and lumbar muscles to a much greater degree than the isolation crunch and oblique crunch. They also trained a larger number of muscles, since the glutes and anterior deltoids had to make a significant contribution in order to the subjects to maintain balance and postural stability.

    Though not tested in this study, the most effective lifts for revealing your abs and strengthening the trunk are loaded multi-joint exercises such as deadlifts, squats, and lunges. For instance, a study published last year that recorded EMG readings on the paraspinal back muscles showed that a deadlift performed at 70 percent of the 1RM load elicited average EMG activity of 88 percent and peak EMG activity of 113.4 percent.

    A back extension was next, producing an average EMG activity of 58 percent, followed by lunges, which produced 46 percent paraspinal muscle activity.

    Researchers concluded that regularly training deadlifts with a load ranging from 70 to 85 percent of the 1RM in conjunction with other multi-joint “global” lifts will optimally strengthen the lower back and help prevent lower back pain.

    Obviously, you need to start with where you are—if you have pain in the lower back or a disc injury, rehabilitative exercises will need to come first to develop base levels of strength and structural balance throughout the muscles of the entire body. Once pain is eliminated and function is improved, use deadlifts and the other global lifts as training staples.
     
    References:
    Gottschall, j., et al. Integration Core Exercises Elicit Greater Muscle Activation Than Isolation Exercises. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 2013. 27(3), 590—596.

    Colado, J., Pablos, C., et al. The Progression of Paraspinal Muscle Recruitment Intensity in Localized and Global Strength Training Exercise is not Based on Instability Alone. Archives of Physical and Medical Rehabilitation. 2011. 92, 1875-1883.
     
    Disclaimer - The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Vorkitout.com. Examples of analysis performed within this article are only examples. They should not be utilized in real-world analytic products as they are based only on very limited and dated open source information. Assumptions made within the analysis are not reflective of the position of Vorkitout.com. 

  • [Image: Lower Cortisol By Getting More of THIS Everyday Nutrient]

    Lower Cortisol By Getting More of THIS Everyday Nutrient


    Article by: The Poliquin Group
    You probably think of vitamin C as your go-to nutrient when you feel a cold coming, but did you know that vitamin C will also lower cortisol?
    Cortisol and Vitamin C
    Research shows that because vitamin C has a powerful effect on the immune system, it can help to clear cortisol after intense exercise or during serious mental stress. For example, when men consumed 1 gram of vitamin C a day for 2 weeks, they had significantly lower cortisol after a 2.5-hour endurance run than a placebo group.
     
    A second study performed on stressed-out Korean office workers found that giving them a large dose of 10 grams of vitamin C significantly reduced feelings of exhaustion.
     
    Why It Works: Vitamin C is protective because it decreases inflammatory markers that alter the body’s stress response. When inflammatory markers build up, the immune system goes into overdrive and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis that regulates the release of cortisol and other hormones becomes dysregulated.
     
    The effects are debilitating: Recovery from training is delayed and muscle mass is compromised. The body spends more of its time in fat-storing mode and body composition is degraded. Sleep is disrupted and chronic fatigue sets in. Ultimately, DNA gets damaged and cellular aging occurs.
     
    How To Get It: Most people can get sufficient vitamin C by eating citrus fruits and leafy greens. Ways to get more C into your diet are to add lemon or lime to water, use citrus in salad dressing and meat and fish marinades, and eat leafy greens at every meal.
     
    The one catch is that you’d have to eat at least 16 servings of citrus and greens a day to equal the 1-gram dose used in the exercise study mentioned above. Therefore, if you’re injured, going through a high-stress time, or are training two-a-days, supplementing may be the way to go.

    Link - http://www.poliquingroup.com/Tips/tabid/130/EntryId/2315/-Lower-Cortisol-By-Getting-More-of-THIS-Eve...

    References:
    Davison, G., Gleeson, M. The Effect of Two Weeks Vitamin C Supplementation on Immunoendocrine Responses to 2.5 Hours Cycling Exercise in Man. European Journal of Applied Physiology. 2006. 97(4), 454-461.
     
    Suh, S., et al. Intravenous Vitamin C Administration Reduces Fatigue in Office Workers. Nutrition Journal. 2012. 11(7).

    Disclaimer - The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Vorkitout.com. Examples of analysis performed within this article are only examples. They should not be utilized in real-world analytic products as they are based only on very limited and dated open source information. Assumptions made within the analysis are not reflective of the position of Vorkitout.com. 

  • [Image: Is it really that good an idea to Cheat??]

    Is it really that good an idea to Cheat??

    So  You're  Thinking  About  Having  a  Cheat  Day - 5/20/15 - Men's Health - Brielle Buis
      
    So You'r e Thinking About Having a Cheat Day
    New  research  finds  muscles  change  after  five  days  of  fatty  food.
    So  you’ve  decided  to  have  a  cheat  day  (or  five.)  What’s  the  harm,  really?
    According  to  a  new  study  conducted  by  the  Virginia  Tech  College  of  Agriculture  and
    Life  Sciences,  your  week  of  binge  eating  may  be  setting  you  back  more  than  you
    thought.
    In  a  recently  published  study  Matt  Hulver  and  other  Virginia  Tech  researchers  found
    that  after  just  five  days  of  eating  a  high­fat  diet,  your  muscles  begin  to  change  the  way
    that  they  process  nutrients.

    "Most  people  think  they  can  indulge  in  high­fat  foods  for  a  few  days  and  get  away  with
    it,"  Hulver  told  Virginia  Tech.  "But  all  it  takes  is  five  days  for  your  body' s  muscle  to
    start to protest."

    Hulver  and  his  team  found  that  the  way  our  muscles  metabolizes  nutrients  is  a  lot
    quicker  of  a  process  than  we  previously  thought.  The  long­term  effects  of  this  change
    include  weight­gain,  obesity,  and  other  health  issues.

    “This  shows  that  our  bodies  are  can  respond  dramatically  to  changes  in  diet  in  a
    shorter  time  frame  than  we  have  previously  thought,”  explained  in  a  video.  “If  you
    think  about  it,  five  days  is  a  very  short  time.  There  are  plenty  of  times  when  we  all  eat
    fatty  foods  for  a  few  days,  be  it  the  holidays,  vacations,  or  other  celebrations.  But  this
    research  shows  that  those  high­fat  diets  can  change  a  person’s  normal  metabolism  in
    a  very  short  timeframe.”

    The  research  was  conducted  on  healthy  college ­age  students.  According  to  the  site
    the  students  were  fed  a  fat­laden  diet  that  included  sausage  biscuits,  macaroni  and
    cheese,  and  food  loaded  with  butter  to  increase  the  percentage  of  there  daily  fat
    intake.
    Muscle  samples  were  then  collected  to  see  how  it  metabolized  glucose.  The  sample
    revealed  that  despite  the  students  not  gaining  any  weight,  the  way  in  which  muscle
    metabolized  glucose  was  altered,  leading  to  potential  long­term  effects.
    According  to  the  study  published  by  Virginia  Tech  the  new  finding  has  sparked
    interest  in  Hulver  and  his  team  to  further  examine  how  these  short­term  changes  effect
    long­term  health.  The  team  also  plans  to  research  a  way  to  reverse  the  process  when
    people  begin  to  eat  right  again.

    Link - http://www.mensfitness.com/nutrition/what­to­eat/so­youre­thinking­abouthaving­cheat­day
    Disclaimer - The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Vorkitout.com. Examples of analysis performed within this article are only examples. They should not be utilized in real-world analytic products as they are based only on very limited and dated open source information. Assumptions made within the analysis are not reflective of the position of Vorkitout.com. 

  • [Image: Fitness & Finance, More Alike Then You Think!!!]

    Fitness & Finance, More Alike Then You Think!!!


    Written by  - Erik Carter
    I often analogize financial planning to dieting and exercise (as if financial planning isn’t unappealing enough already). The pain and effort comes now and the benefits come later. Both are also the subject of numerous New Year’s Eve resolutions that are cast aside by Groundhog’s Day.So how can we get better at managing our health and wealth? It turns out that the process is very similar to both. I can speak from experience here. As a financial planner and educator, I help people struggling to manage their money. When it comes to health, I’m on the other side. After years of very inconsistent dieting and exercising, I’ve finally been making significant progress over the last few couple of months. I’ve lost over 20 lbs so far and made significant progress in my workout performance. Here are some fitness tips from an article called “6 Truths About Exercise That Nobody Wants to Believe” and how they relate to your financial fitness:
    1. You need to commit for the long term.When I set out to achieve my pre-law school fitness level, I knew it would take about 9-12 months of consistent dieting and exercising. One of the biggest mistakes people make is looking for quick results. With physical fitness, this leads to disappointment and possibly lots of money wasted on “quick fix” gadgets and miracle supplements. With financial fitness, it can cause you to jump on the hot investment that’s more likely nearing its peak. In both cases, real results come from small improvements over time so set a long term goal (retire by 55 with 75% of your income) and a plan to move towards it over time (max out your 401(k) and maintain a moderate asset allocation). Keep in mind that we tend to overestimate what we can do in the short term and underestimate what we can do in the long term.
    2. You need to set a schedule for your training.With my ever-changing schedule, I don’t have a consistent diet and workout schedule but I make it a priority to eat 5-6 small, healthy meals about every 3 hours and follow my P90X workout routine 6 days a week no matter how inconvenient it may be. With your finances, it’s about setting a budget to make sure you’re saving enough and then sticking to a disciplined investment strategy.
    3. You need to focus on the best exercises.That generally means the tough stuff: lots of rigorous cardio, free weights, calisthenics, and yoga moves rather than using fancy equipment or casually running on a treadmill while watching TV. The best “investment exercises” are simple too. Stick to a diversified portfolio of low cost stock and bond index funds rather than esoteric investment strategies or “sophisticated” financial products with high fees.
    4. You need to start light and train for volume before intensity.Before diving into P90X, I started with the much easier Power 90 and then did the intermediate Power 90 Master Series. Otherwise, you can easily get discouraged or even hurt trying to take on too much too soon. It’s the same with your finances. Start by building up an emergency fund and paying off your high interest debt before you worry too much about investing and retirement planning.
    5. You need to make slow progress each week.Your exercise goal should be to do a little better each week. That’s how your body improves. The same is true for your finances. Fortunately, the markets are doing most of the work for you but you can do your part by gradually increasing your savings rate. See if your retirement plan offers a contribution rate escalator that automatically increases your retirement plan contributions slowly over time. If not, you can simply save part of your pay raises and cost-of-living increases.
    6. You need to record your workouts. This is an important step because it lets you know what you need to do next time (see tip #5). It also allows you to see your progress and remain motivated to keep going. If you’re not making progress, it’s an indication you may need to make some changes. In the same way, chart your progress towards your financial goals, whether they be building an emergency fund to cover 3-6 months of necessary expense, paying off high-interest debt, saving for a down payment on a home, or being able to retire comfortably.  
    If nothing else, you’ll want to adjust your plans as things change like your goals, your personal situation, and external factors like tax laws, investment opportunities and benefits at work. Financial planning isn’t a one-time event but an ongoing process.As you can see there are lots of similarities between physical and financial fitness. Fittingly (no pun intended), a growing number of employers are offering a combined physical and financial wellness program for their employees.
    Let’s hope that trend continues as both are integral components of a full life.
    Disclaimer - The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Vorkitout.com. Examples of analysis performed within this article are only examples. They should not be utilized in real-world analytic products as they are based only on very limited and dated open source information. Assumptions made within the analysis are not reflective of the position of Vorkitout.com. 
    Link - http://www.financialfinesse.com/blog/2013/11/how-financial-fitness-is-like-physical-fitness/
    See more at: http://www.financialfinesse.com/blog/2013/11/how-financial-fitness-is-like-physical-fitness/#sthash....
  • [Image: Eight Reasons Everyone Should Do Sprints]

    Eight Reasons Everyone Should Do Sprints

    By Poliquin Group™ Editorial Staff
    3/20/2013 4:54:23 PM
     
    “Where does the power come from to see the race to its end?“
    “From within.”

        —Chariots of Fire

    Do sprints to lose fat, build muscle, improve your health, and live a more excellent life. Sprint training is a powerful tool that gives you back considerably more in terms of health benefits than the effort required.
     
    Sprint training IS mentally challenging due to the physiological stress it causes, but it’s well worth the effort: It takes much less time than the next best exercise models, which don’t even convey as many advantages. Better heart and lung health, improved circulation, better cognition, improved metabolism, the optimal hormonal environment, and the ideal body composition are just a few of the reasons everyone should do some form of sprint training.
     
    It should be noted that there is a difference between all-out sprinting (moving at your fastest possible speed for a certain distance) and high-intensity training (alternating bursts of very intense activity with intervals of rest), both in terms of protocols and training outcomes. Luckily, the health benefits and fat loss come from doing either one, though with slightly varied returns that are related to the effort you put into your workouts. Get best results by programming according to your goals, physical limitations, and abilities.
     
    Reason #1: Lose Fat Fast With Sprint Training
     
    Research shows that repeated sprint training is the only form of conditioning to produce significant fat loss, and it does so in an amazingly small amount of training time. Scientists write that compared to steady-state aerobic training, which produces disappointing fat loss, sprints are much more effective for fat loss in a shorter time.  
     
    A classic 1994 study is indicative of this: Participants did either 20 weeks of steady-state aerobic training or 15 weeks of intervals (15 sprints for 30 seconds each). The interval group lost nine times more body fat and 12 percent more visceral belly fat than the aerobic group.
     
    Depending on training status (trained, untrained, or athlete), initial body composition, and protocol, sprint training can decrease body fat by 10 to 20 percent over a typical 12-week program. For example, a protocol that has been tested repeatedly on overweight men and women that uses 60 all-out 8-second cycle sprints with 12 seconds rest led to about 2.5 kg fat loss and 1 kg muscle gain in both men and women.
     
    The benefits of sprints are evident quickly: A 2010 study found that just 6 sprint sessions of six 30-second all-out cycle sprints with 4 minutes rest over 2 weeks led to a leaner waist by 3 cm., and a much greater use of fat for fuel. It’s not surprising that the men didn’t actually decrease body weight over the short study period since sprints will trigger muscle building just as they start burning  body fat. But the shrinking waistline and increased fat oxidation would very likely lead to more dramatic fat loss if they kept the training up for a few months.
     
    Reason #2: Build Muscle & Target Fast-Twitch Fibers
     
    Sprint training will help you build muscle and it preferentially increases the size and strength of the powerful, fast-twitch fibers. Studies show sprinting enhances protein synthesis pathways by as much as 230 percent! With the right nutrition and recovery, this will lead to muscle building, allowing you to look leaner and run faster.
     
    In addition, sprint training has repeatedly been shown to increase anabolic hormones that improve body composition. For instance, male wrestlers who did short-sprint training (six 35-meter sprints with 10 seconds recovery) significantly increased testosterone and decreased cortisol, leading to a favorable ratio between the two hormones for muscle building and fat loss.
     
    Women won’t experience the same increase in testosterone, but sprints will increase growth hormone (GH), burning fat and building muscle for a strong, lean outcome. In fact, some studies indicate that women have higher baseline GH and may get a bigger boost in GH in response to intense training, although more research needs to be done.
     
    Reason #3: Increase Endurance & Work Capacity
     
    Studies show that sprint training is more effective than steady-state endurance training for improving endurance capacity, maximal oxygen uptake, and time to fatigue. This is because repeated intervals at a high intensity lead to the following adaptations:
     
    •    They require the body to use energy more efficiently by increasing the amount of glycogen that can be stored in the muscle by as much as 20 percent.
     
    •    Sprints  “train” the body to burn fat for fuel, preserving muscle glycogen and prolonging work capacity.
     
    •    Intervals increase the body’s ability to remove waste products during exercise, leading to a 50 percent increase in what is called the muscle buffering capacity.
     
    •    Since sprints build muscle and target the fast-twitch fibers, they increase your speed and power, leading to a faster running or cycling speed. For example, one study found that trained cyclists who did six 30-second all-out sprints increased endurance speed, and decreased time trial performance by 26 percent more than a steady-state training group that did their regular workouts.
     
    Reason #4: Improve Heart Health
     
    Comparison studies between interval and endurance training repeatedly show better cardiovascular outcomes from intervals. For example, a 2011 study in overweight women showed increased stroke volume and lower training and resting heart rate after 4 weeks of cycle sprint training. A similar 2008 study showed better arterial structure, with a decrease in chronic inflammation that damages heart function, from sprints than from aerobic training.
     
    Other cardiovascular benefits include a significant decrease in systolic blood pressure. Of course, for the elderly who need to prioritize both cardiovascular health and functional mobility, interval training is preferred because it can help then build the fast-twitch muscles to prevent falls and fractures, while improving heart function. Aerobic exercise should be secondary since it leads to a loss in muscle and explosive power in the long term.
     
    Reason #5: Improve Insulin Sensitivity & Energy Use
     
    A number of studies show any time you alternate intense bursts of exercise with rest periods, you will improve insulin sensitivity and blood sugar tolerance. This is partly because sprints decrease chronic inflammation and partly because the cells must adapt to more efficiently produce energy to keep you going.
     
    Sprints improve insulin health in the young, old, overweight, diabetic, and folks with metabolic syndrome. As mentioned early, they increase fat burning during training and lead to a measurable post-workout calorie burn (called EPOC). Throw in the fat burning hormone response to training and you have a potent fat loss environment.
     
    For example, a 2006 review showed that protocols that are more anaerobic in nature, as sprints are, produce higher EPOC than steady-state training because the trained muscle cells must restore physiological factors in the cells. This translates into a lot of extra energy expenditure to help get you lean.
     
    Reason #6: Improve Conditioning, Circulation & Lung Function
     
    Sprint training is better for improving pulmonary lung function than aerobic exercise. It will give you better conditioning so you can run up the stairs or chase after your kids without getting winded.  
     
    For example, a 23-minute sprint workout that included five 1-mintue intervals with 3 minutes rest significantly improved lung capacity compared to an aerobic protocol. Sprint participants also lowered cholesterol  and improved circulation.
     
    Reason #7: Improve Cognition, Brain Volume & Prevent Depression
     
    It’s no surprise that sprint training makes your brain work better and can make you happier since just about every form of exercise has been shown to reap some mental benefits. Sprint training leads the pack: It decreases inflammation in the brain, improves hormone balance, leads to better mobility, and makes you feel energized and capable after you blast through a series of repetitions that test your abilities.
     
    Reason #8: Save Time, While Building Mental Toughness

    Sprint training can and needs to be done in a short amount of total training time. You can’t keep up the intensity level necessary for your intervals to be called sprints for much longer than 20 minutes. And you’ll get the best fat loss, muscle building and health results from keeping it short, simple and intense. You don’t need crazy volume here, you just have to train hard and with intention.
     
    Sprints are hard. They hurt. There will be moments of doubt when you are in the middle of a sprint workout. The pain and uncertainty in your ability to finish your workout is all in your head. You must not give in.
     
    By pushing through the physical discomfort and pain, you will build confidence in your physical and emotional ability. You will accomplish something not many other people can do. You will get a lean, muscular body, and improve your health, putting you ahead of the biggest health threats that face you as you age.
     
    Start a sprint training program today. Now is the time.
     
    “One of the illusions of this life is that the present hour is not the critical, decisive hour. Right it on your heart that every day is the best day of the year.”
    –Ralph Waldo Emerson
    Schuenke, M., Mikat, R., et al. Effect of an Acute Period of Resistance Exercise on EPOC Implications for Body Mass Management. 2002. 86, 411-417.
     
    Hottenrott, K., Sebastian, L., et al. Effects of High-Intensity Training and Continuous Endurance Training on Aerobic Capacity and Body Composition in Recreationally Active Runners. Journal of Sports Science and Medicine. 2012. 11, 483-488.
     
    Trapp, E., Chisholm, D., et al. The Effects of High-Intensity Intermittent Exercise Training on Fat Loss and Fasting Insulin Levels of Young Women. International Journal of Obesity. 2008. 32(4), 684-691.
     
    Tremblay, A., Simoneau, J., et al. Impact of Exercise Intensity on Body Fatness and Skeletal Muscle Metabolism. Metabolism. 1994. 43(7), 814-818.
     
    Gunnarson, T., Bangsbo, J. The 10-20-30 Training Concept Improves Performance and Health Profile in Moderately Trained Runners. Journal of Applied Physiology. 2012. 113, 1, 1624-1633.
     
    Heydari, M., Freud, J., et al. The Effect of High-Intensity Intermittent Exercise on Body Composition of Overweight Young Males. Journal of Obesity. 2012. Published Ahead of Print.
     
    Tanner, A., Nielsen, B., et al. Salivary Steroid Hormone Response in Trained Men to Running and Circuit Training Sessions. British Journal of Sports Medicine. December 2011. 45(15), A6.
     
    Meckel, Y., Nemet, D., Bar-Sela, S., Radom-Aizik, S.  Hormonal and Inflammatory Responses to Different Types of Sprint Interval Training. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 2011. 25(8), 2161-2169.
     
    Irving, B., Davis, C., et al. Effect of Exercise Training Intensity on Abdominal Visceral Fat and Body Composition. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2008. 40(11), 1863-1872.
     
    Boudou, P., Sobnngwi, E., et al. Absence of Exercise-Induced Variations in Adiponectin Levels Despite Decreased abdominal Adiposity and Improved Insulin sensitivity in Type 2 Diabetic Men. European Journal of Endocrinology. 2003. 149(5), 421-424.
     
    Macpherson, R., Hazell, T., et al. Run Sprint Interval Training Improves Aerobic Performance but Not Maximal Cardiac Output. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2011. 43(1), 115-121.
     
    Strasser, B., Arvandi, M., et al. Resistance training, Visceral Obesity and Inflammatory Response: A Review of the Evidence. Obesity Reviews. 2012. Published Ahead of Print.
     
    Ismail, I., Keating, S., et al. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Effect of Aerobic Vs. Resistance Exercise Training on Visceral Fat. Obesity Reviews. 2012. 13, 68-91.
    Copyright © 2013
    Link - http://www.poliquingroup.com/ArticlesMultimedia/Articles/Article/989/Eight_Reasons_Everyone_Should_D...
    Disclaimer - The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Vorkitout.com. Examples of analysis performed within this article are only examples. They should not be utilized in real-world analytic products as they are based only on very limited and dated open source information. Assumptions made within the analysis are not reflective of the position of Vorkitout.com. 
  • [Image: Why THIS Food Is Most Important For Losing Belly Fat]

    Why THIS Food Is Most Important For Losing Belly Fat

    Monday, May 04, 2015 7:31 AM
     
    High-quality protein is the most important food for losing belly fat.
    The most consistent indicator of leanness around the waist is a high-quality protein intake, which is defined as foods that contain a “threshold” amount of 10 grams of essential amino acids (EAAs).
     
    For example, a large study of young volunteers found that those who ate the 10-gram “threshold” dose of EAAs at every meal had the least belly fat, and the number of times they reached the EAA threshold was also significant.
     
    How to use it: Eat animal-derived protein—beef, fish, poultry, milk, and eggs—at every meal. You get more bang for your calorie buck by eating these foods.
     
    Use lower quality protein sources, such beans, lentils, and some vegetables as sides and condiments. There are many benefits to plant proteins, but if you get most of your protein from lower quality sources you have to eat more calories to get the same overall EAA intake.
     
    Reference:
    Loenneke, J., Wilson, J., et al. Quality of Protein Intake is Inversely Related with Abdominal Fat. Nutrition and Metabolism. 2012. 9(5).
    Link - http://www.poliquingroup.com/Tips/tabid/130/EntryId/2312/Why-THIS-Food-Is-Most-Important-For-Losing-...
    Disclaimer - The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Vorkitout.com. Examples of analysis performed within this article are only examples. They should not be utilized in real-world analytic products as they are based only on very limited and dated open source information. Assumptions made within the analysis are not reflective of the position of Vorkitout.com. 
     
  • [Image: The Perfect Sunday Morning Healthy Breakfast]

    The Perfect Sunday Morning Healthy Breakfast

    Leek, spinach and feta omelettes
    Shake up your weeknight meal routine with this vegetarian leek, spinach and feta omelette!

    Ingredients
    0g butter
     2 leeks, trimmed, halved lengthwise, thinly sliced
     2 cloves garlic, crushed
     1/4 cup tarragon leaves, finely chopped
     100g baby spinach, plus extra, to serve
     6 eggs
     2 tablespoons finely chopped flat-leaf parsley
     80ml (1/3 cup) olive oil, plus extra, to drizzle
     50g (1/4 cup) Persian (marinated) feta, crumbled
     Roasted pine nuts (optional), to serve
    Method
    1. Melt butter in a large frying pan over medium heat. Add leeks, garlic and tarragon, and cook, stirring
    occasionally, for 15 minutes or until leeks are soft. Add spinach and stir to combine. Cook for a further 30
    seconds or until spinach is wilted. Season with salt and pepper.
    2. Whisk eggs, parsley and 1 tablespoon cold water in a large bowl. Heat 2 tablespoons oil in a 26cm non-stick
    frying pan over medium–high heat. Add half the egg mixture, swirling pan to coat base. Cook for 2 minutes or
    until top is almost set and base is golden.
    3. Spoon half the leek mixture over half the omelette. Fold omelette over to enclose. Slide onto a plate and
    scatter with half each of the feta and extra spinach. Repeat with remaining oil, egg mixture, leek mixture, feta
    and spinach.
    4. Drizzle with extra oil and scatter with pine nuts, if using, to serve.

    Article taken by Taste.com - http://www.taste.com.au/recipes/27704/leek+spinach+and+feta+omelettes?ref=collections,healthy-breakf...

    Disclaimer - The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Vorkitout.com. Examples of analysis performed within this article are only examples. They should not be utilized in real-world analytic products as they are based only on very limited and dated open source information. Assumptions made within the analysis are not reflective of the position of Vorkitout.com. 

  • [Image: Lose Body Fat Without Losing Muscle: Do Sprints for Better Health and Performance]

    Lose Body Fat Without Losing Muscle: Do Sprints for Better Health and Performance

    Lose Body Fat Without Losing Muscle: Do Sprints for Better Health and Performance
    By - The Poliquin Group
    Thursday, January 08, 2015 12:27 PM
     
    Do sprints to get healthier and lose fat without losing muscle. A new study shows that an effective short-sprint workout can be done in half the time required for an endurance running program, and it produces better results.
     
    Sports scientists compared the effects of a 7-week short-sprint training program and an endurance program on various health markers and running performance. Participants were all recreational runners with equal health status.
     
    The sprint interval program took less than half the training time of the endurance running protocol, which consisted of three 8-km workouts a week. The sprint program included 3 to 5 sets of short sprints (10, 20, or 30 seconds in length).
     
    Results showed that the short-sprint group increased maximal oxygen uptake by 5 percent, reduced systolic blood pressure by 5 mmHg, and lowered LDL cholesterol by a clinically significant amount. The endurance-training group had no improvements in any of these markers. In addition, the short-sprint group improved performance in a mile time trial by 6 percent whereas the endurance group had no change.
     
    Researchers also measured markers of muscle adaptations to determine whether the workouts produced an environment that was anabolic so as to build muscle and improve body composition, or catabolic so as to degrade muscle.
     
    The sprint triggered muscle protein synthesis, indicating that the high-intensity sprints can prevent loss of muscle tissue, which is particularly important if you want to get lean and keep the fat off. In contrast, the endurance group produced muscle protein breakdown, indicating that muscle and lean tissue is being lost as a result of the endurance training.
     
    Sprints are your best bet if you want to be healthier, be leaner, and improve performance. They go well with a strength training program since both call on the anaerobic energy system to produce a better body composition.
     
    Sprint training also produces adaptations that improve performance for activities that call on the aerobic energy systems, such as distance running, cycling, rowing, swimming, or soccer.
     
     
    Reference
    Bangsbo, J., Gunnarsson, T. The 10-20-30 Training Concept Improves Performance and Health Profile in Moderately Trained Runners. Journal of Applied Physiology. 2012. Published Ahead of Print.
    Link - http://www.poliquingroup.com/Tips/tabid/130/EntryId/2309/Do-Sprints-for-Better-Health-and-Performanc...
    Disclaimer - The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Vorkitout.com. Examples of analysis performed within this article are only examples. They should not be utilized in real-world analytic products as they are based only on very limited and dated open source information. Assumptions made within the analysis are not reflective of the position of Vorkitout.com.

  • [Image: Save Time & Lose Fat With High-Intensity Resistance Training]

    Save Time & Lose Fat With High-Intensity Resistance Training

    Article Originally Published By - By Poliquin Group™ Editorial Staff

    Save Time & Lose Fat With High-Intensity Resistance Training

    Save training time and lose fat by doing high-intensity resistance training. A new study from Italy shows that a metabolically intense weight-training program performed to failure will help you lose fat because it burns much more energy than a traditional training program.
     
    The term “intensity” in this case doesn’t refer to the intensity of the load, but to the workout protocol causing metabolic stress so that it favorably increases energy use in the 24 hours after the workout.
     
    Known as excess post-exercise oxygen consumption or EPOC, post-exercise calorie burn is often discounted by trainers and public health officials as a viable tool for fat loss because it requires you to work hard and push through some physical pain—it’s not easy to get that extra calorie burn, but when you do, it will pay off. This tip will show you why the effort is worth it.
     
    Researchers used weight-trained young men and had them perform one of two weight-training programs:
     
    1) a Traditional program of 4 sets to failure of 8 exercises with an intensity of 75 percent of the 1RM, or
     
    2) a High-Intensity program of 3 sets per exercise of leg press, chest press, and pull-downs performed using an intensity of 85 percent of the 1RM lifted to failure with two subsequent 20-second rest-periods followed by additional lifts to failure.
     
    Results showed that the following:
    The Traditional program took 62 minutes, resulted in 7835 kg being lifted, and produced an elevation in blood lactate of 5.1 mmol/L post-workout. At 22 hours after exercise, this group experienced a 5 percent increase in calorie burn, increasing from an average 1901 to 1999 resting energy expenditure/day. An insignificant increase in the use of fat for fuel occurred as measured by the respiratory exchange ratio of 0.822.
     
    The High-Intensity (HIT) program took 32 minutes, resulted in 3872 kg being lifted, and produced an elevation in blood lactate of 10.5 mmol/L post-workout. At 22 hours after exercise, this group experienced a 24 percent increase in calorie burn, increasing from an average 1909 to 2362 resting energy expenditure/day. A shift to use fat for fuel occurred as measured by the respiratory exchange ratio of 0.798.
     
    As you can see, in half the time and performing about half the volume, the HIT participants burned significantly more calories. An increase of 452 calories in resting expenditure, which is what the HIT group experienced, is not negligible and would be highly effective for producing rapid fat loss if the workout was performed 2 to 3 times a week. Take note that the 452 calories is resting expenditure and doesn’t account for any additional energy burned during the workout.
     
    Researchers suggest the HIT weight lifting protocol produces a similar “perturbation of energy homeostasis” as sprint intervals that have also been shown to significantly elevate EPOC and produce fat loss. Here’s why:
     
    First, it appears beneficial to lift to failure and use very short rest to produce a major build up of lactate. The need to remove blood lactate—a waste product—will elevate energy expenditure.
     
    Second, during high-intensity training, the body will shift to burn fatty acids to satisfy the high energy cost of exercise, leading to the use of fat stores for fuel.
     
    Third, though not measured in this study, it’s probable that the high metabolic stress of the workout and short rest periods elevated growth hormone, a hormone that mobilizes fat to be burned for energy.
     
    Researchers note that an increase in EPOC is not guaranteed: Previous studies investigating EPOC show that it can be elevated by metabolically stressful training or by lifting a very high volume, neither of which are normally achieved by the average person throwing weights around in the gym.
     
    Take away the following points:
    If your goal is to strip body fat quickly, high-intensity training is ideal, but it must be programmed correctly. This method of short rest periods using moderately heavy loads lifted to failure with additional short sets to failure in a rest-pause manner is effective.
     
    Be sure to sequence exercises so that as you become fatigued you don’t put yourself at risk of injury due to poor technique.
     
    Sprint workouts are another effective fat loss method, especially if your weight-training goal is not fat loss, such as building strength or power.

    References
    Paoli, A., et al. High-Intensity Interval Resistance Training Influences Resting Energy Expenditure and Respiratory Ratio in Non-Dieting Individuals. Journal of Translational Medicine. 2012. 10(1), 237.